Weber: Avoid These 5 Mistakes When Making Ribs

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#1 Wait to put the BBQ sauce on at the end

Putting BBQ sauce on the ribs at the beginning seems like it would be a good idea. After all, isn’t that BBQ sauce flavor going to get into the meat and make it taste better? Well, not really. What’s actually going to happen is the BBQ sauce is probably going to burn and create a layer of black char all over the surface of your ribs. Avoid this by adding the BBQ sauce only at the very end of the grilling session. After brushing the sauce onto the ribs they will usually take another 10 to 30 minutes, depending on the temperature you’re grilling at. You can also wait until you’ve taken the ribs off the grill before putting the sauce on them.

#2 A little flavor goes a long way

Once upon a time, I thought that I needed to go really heavy on using seasonings in order to give my ribs a good flavor, but it’s actually a much better idea to lean a little bit on the light side when it comes to seasoning in order to not overpower the flavor of the meat itself. You can always add more seasoning if you need to, but you can’t really take it off if you’d added too much. The same can be said about using woods to add a smoky flavor to the ribs. Too much smoke might end up making the ribs taste bitter.

#3 Boiling your ribs before grilling them is cheating

It’s not unheard of for some grillers to boil their ribs before grilling them. It’s a method that can be used to cut down the overall cooking time, and can also make for some very tender ribs, but if you’re using your stove to do most of the cooking and then just finishing them on the grill you may as well just cook them in the oven or broiler. Boiling your ribs will also remove a lot of flavor from them.

#4 Remove the membrane

On the back of most ribs, there is a thin connective piece of tissue called the membrane or silver-skin. It’s a good idea to remove the membrane from the rib otherwise it can become tough and rubbery during the grilling process. Click here for instructions on removing the membrane.

#5 Low and slow is the name of the game

Pretty much every rib recipe out there calls for using a low and slow, indirect grilling method. Grilling them over direct, high heat is a great way to overcook them and have them turn out tough. Indirect, low heat will help create tender meat that will easily tear off of the bone. It can be tempting to try and grill them faster over direct, high heat, but going low and slow will allow you to create some ribs that will impress your guests, and your taste buds.

Weber Rib Recipes
At some point, every meat lover has eaten boring, bland ribs that have been drowned with BBQ sauce to provide them with some flavor, but it doesn’t have to be that way! You might be surprised at how creative you can get with ribs. Check out some of our rib recipes here, here and here to help inspire your next grill session.

Baby back ribs are probably the most popular type of rib, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t try one of the other ones! Check out our Rib 101 blog to learn about the different types of ribs!

To maximize the rib capacity of your grill, check out some of our rib racks here, here, and here.

Learn how to use a rib rack here.

Game Day Grilling Tips from Broil King

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Football championships are some of the biggest grilling days of the year.    If you are planning on firing up the grill, here are a few helpful tips to ensure winning results. 

  • Preheat your barbecue to at least 400º before cleaning or putting food on the grill.  If it doesn’t sizzle, your grill is not hot enough
  • Bring proteins to room temperature before grilling – this will enhance tenderness and result in more even cooking
  • Lightly oil any grill surface with vegetable oil while hot – it will keep food from sticking
  • Grill with the lid closed – it will reduce flare-ups, improve flavour, and keep a more constant temperature
  • Preheat BBQ sauces on the side burner – cold sauce applied to warm meats can toughen the meat and lengthen cooking times
  • Use a meat thermometer to ensure the food is cooked to the desired donesness for maximum juiciness and tenderness.
  • Let cooked proteins rest between one quarter and one-third of the total cooking time before serving (5 minutes for steaks, chops, and other individual portions, up to 30 minutes for chickens, turkeys, and roasts)
  • Prep as much as you can ahead of time.  Cut up vegetables,  prepare toppings,  marinate meat and form patties the day before to ensure you don’t miss any of the action on game day.

Here are a few recipe ideas that are sure to please any game day crowd

Stuffed Burgers

Grilled Chicken Wings with Roquefort Dip

Bacon Wrapped Stuffed Jalapenos

Chicken, Shitake Mushroom and Coriander Pizza 

Maple Smoked Ribs

Broil King: Barbecued Back Ribs

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A rib rack is a great tool to have, but if you haven’t bought yours yet try stacking the ribs against each other on an angle. Lay the ribs flat on the grids for the last few minutes of cooking while brushing them with the sauce.

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 lb pork backribs
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 cup ketchup
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/3 cup worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tbsp chili powder
  • dash hot pepper sauce
  • 2 tbsp brown sugar

 

DIRECTIONS
  1. Place a drip pan over the vapourizer, under the cooking grids. Pour in one inch of water or other liquid such as apple cider or wine, or a combination. Replace the cooking grids and preheat barbecue on LOW.
  2. Peel the membrane off the back of the ribs using your fingers. (This makes an enormous difference in the tenderness of the ribs.) Cut each sleeve or rack of ribs into six inch sections. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and place in a rib rack on the barbecue. Cook slowly on lowest heat for 1 hour.
  3. Meanwhile, combine the remaining ingredients in a saucepan and simmer on the side burner until the sauce thickens. Apply this sauce during the last few minutes of cooking to prevent the sugar from burning, and pass the extra around the table.

Crown Verity: Cook Your Favorite Oven Recipe On The Grill. Here’s How.

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TURN YOUR GRILL INTO AN OUTDOOR OVEN

Your oven cooks using indirect heat. Your grill uses direct contact heat. To turn your grill into an oven, you still want to heat the grill but, because you’ll be using it differently, you shouldn’t turn all the elements on. This effectively creates a baking/convection environment. It also leaves a place for you to put the food so it doesn’t touch a direct heat source. Which elements you prefer to use are up to you: some prefer to the inside burners while others like to turn on the outside ones instead.

Another must-do is to set your grill temperature 25 degrees F higher than what is called for in your recipe. This is because grills lose heat faster than an oven when the lid is opened. That extra little bit of heat will help compensate for it. And speaking of opening the lid, try to avoid unnecessary “peeking” since this will definitely affect your grill’s ability to cook evenly and will add to the length of time needed to finish. (Tip: If you’re using a baking sheet, a layer of foil between the sheet and the grill may help reduce scorching.)

TRY STEAMING OR POACHING

Yes, your grill will do this beautifully for you. While there are veggie trays and steam pan accessories available for some grills, you can steam or poach on virtually any grill using a foil packet. Lay a large sheet on a flat surface. Place your ingredients in the centre then pull one side over to the other, roll the edges together to seal and fold the remaining side in to close. It’s recommended that you not seal this too tightly as there will be expansion during the steaming process.

GRILLED VEGGIES ADD A NEW DIMENSION TO SALADS

Don’t be limited by the kinds of vegetables you do on the grill. Sure, there are the go-to veggies that are top performers like carrots, potatoes, corn, tomatoes and the like. But when you use your grill as your oven, it opens up a whole host of possibilities – options that your oven simple can’t offer. For starters, try amping up your greens. Have you tried grilling vegetables like cabbage or romaine? It’s the same as grilling corn or zucchini – just cut the head half, grease lightly with olive oil and place cut-side down on the grill for about five minutes.

SO MANY OPTIONS, SO MANY WAYS TO GRILL

Pizzas? Quesadillas? Yes, and more. Your outdoor grill can do just about anything that your indoor grill can – and then some. Your pizza stone will work just as well on your grill as it will in your oven. Quesadillas are another tasty surprise that you might not have thought about before. Desserts? Absolutely. There’s grilled watermelon, fruit kebabs, cobblers, even pies.

There really is no limit to the delicious possibilities that open up when you adapt a favorite recipe for the grill.

Broil King: 5 Reasons Why You Should Grill Your Holiday Turkey

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Tis the season for eating Turkey and if you are one of the growing number of chefs thinking about grilling your holiday bird, here are 5 reasons to help convince you why you should.

  • Flavor – what grilling is all about.   You can’t beat the flavor, texture or aroma of a grilled turkey.  Grilling also allows you to add another layer of flavor by adding smoke to the grilling environment.
  • More room in your oven.   Cooking your turkey on your grill leaves lots of oven space for other delicious menu items like scalloped potatoes and pumpkin pie.
  • Clean-up is a breeze.    If you grill your turkey you won’t have a roasting pan to soak and scrub – but you can still use a disposable roasting pan to catch drippings for gravy.
  • Impressive presentation – a beautifully grilled turkey with golden-brown, crispy skin is sure to impress your friends and family.
  • Create a separate space – On a warm Thanksgiving day, some of your guests will certainly want to see what all the fuss is about – let them gather around the grill and offer up some appetizers in your outdoor space.

It’s that simple.

Here are some helpful links for getting started:

Grilling Turkey –  Rotisserie Method

Grilling Turkey – Convection Method

Turkey on the Smoker 

Blue Star Recipe: Spice Rubbed Pork Chop with Polenta & Romesco

When Chef Bobby Flay was designing his home kitchen he wanted to create a space that would rival what he can do in his restaurants.  That is why he chose the professional-level power and performance of the BlueStar Platinum Series for his NYC home.  From the searing 25,000 BTU burners to the extra-large convection oven that can fit a full-size sheet pan, he says his 60” gas range is the closest thing he can get to a professional range at home.

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Bring the flavors of the Mediterranean into your kitchen with this Spice Rubbed Pork Chop with Polenta and Romesco Sauce recipe from Chef Bobby Flay’s New York City restaurant Gato.  This recipe is big on flavor thanks to its unique spice blend.

 

Spice Rubbed Pork Chop with Polenta & Romesco

Serves: 4

Romesco

  • Olive oil
  • Canola oil
  • 3 large roasted red peppers, peeled, seeded and chopped, drained and patted dry
  • 1/3 cup marcona almonds
  • Ciabatta bread, cut into small cubes
  • 1/4 cup golden raisins, soaked in water and drained
  • 2 ancho chiles, soaked in hot water, drained, stems and seeds removed
  • 4 plum tomatoes
  • 5 cloves garlic
  • 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • Honey
  • 2 teaspoons harissa paste
  • 2 teaspoons Calabrian chile puree
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  1. Heat a few tablespoons of oil in a large saute pan over high heat.  Add the peppers, cook until lightly golden brown, and remove to the bowl of a food processor.  Add more oil, fry the almonds until golden brown, and remove with a slotted spoon to food processor bowl with peppers.  Continue frying each ingredient separately and adding to the bowl up until the garlic cloves.
  2. Add the vinegar, honey, harissa and Calabrian chile paste and process until smooth.  Add more olive oil if needed and season with salt and pepper.

Polenta

  • 3 cups homemade chicken stock or mushroom stock or low sodium canned chicken stock
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 cup medium grind polenta
  • 1/4 cup freshly grated parmesan cheese
  • 1/2 cup romesco sauce, recipe above
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  1. Bring stock and milk to a boil in a large saucepan over high heat, add the salt.  Slowly whisk in the polenta and continue whisking until it begins to thicken.  Lower the heat to medium-low and continue to cook, stirring occasionally until thickened and soft, about 25 minutes, adding more stock or milk if needed.
  2. Remove from heat, stir in the cheese and fold in the romesco.

Gremolata

  • 1/4 cup finely chopped parsley
  • 1 large clove garlic, finely chopped to a paste
  • Olive oil
  • Finely grated zest of lemon
  • Finely grated zest of orange
  • Kosher salt and pepper
  1. Combine in a bowl and season with salt and pepper

Spice Rubbed Pork

  • 3 tablespoons Spanish paprika
  • 3 tablespoons ground cumin
  • 3 tablespoons ground dry mustard
  • 3 tablespoons light brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons ground coriander
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons ground fennel
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Canola oil
  • 4 pork chops
  • Chervil leaves, for garnish
  • Chive oil, for garnish
  1. Combine the spices in a small bowl.  Remove the pork from the refrigerator 30 minutes before cooking.  Season the pork on both sides with salt and pepper and rub one side with the spice rub.
  2. Heat a few tablespoons of the oil in the pan over high heat until almost smoking.  Put the pork in the pan, rub side down and cook until a crust forms, about 4 minutes.  Turn the chops over, reduce heat and continue cooking to medium-well doneness, about 5 minutes longer.  If pork is thick, finish in a 400 degree oven for about 8 minutes.  Remove to a cutting board and let rest for 5 minutes before cutting.
  3. Add polenta to plate, then place pork chop on top.
  4. Place dollop of romesco sauce on top of the pork chop.
  5. Garnish with gremolata, chive oil and chervil.